Parra Trooper


About Spores and Hyphae

There are two active parts of Parra Trooper, spores and hyphae. The hyphae are like the runners of a grass and the

Spores and Hyphae of Nigrospora oryzae
At 200x you can see that there are hundreds of spores and a solid mat of hyphae.

spores are like seeds. If you make a spray with a 60g pack of Parra Trooper and 200L of untreated water, there will be about 20 spores for every drop of that 200L. There will also be many fragments of hyphae. Each of those fragments has the potential to grow into a fungi that produces millions of spores and unimaginable amounts of hyphae.

The spores are hardy and can survive droughts and freezing weather. They will, like many seeds, sprout only when the conditions are right. The hyphae, on the other hand, are fragile. Hyphae will die if they get hot or dry. It is the hyphae that are Parra Trooper’s secret weapon and the spores that are the back-up. When a fragment of hyphae lands it will begin to grow immediately and, if the weather is kind to the fragile, microscopic, strand, it will grow fast.

A big cluster of Nigrospora oryzae spores
A cluster of spores on Parra Trooper substrate photographed at 200X

Our research and testing indicates that it is these hyphae that are responsible for the fast response times that have been reported this year. Parra Trooper is still a new product and we are still learning about how it works but there is no doubt that it does work and, in some conditions, it works fast.

For best results it is best to use Parra Trooper when the weather is a bit damp and not too hot.

Spores
There is much more hyphae than there are spores.

Parra Trooper is pure Nigrospora oryzae

 

 Dr Mary Cole
Dr Mary Cole

Parra Trooper is a source of pure Nigrospora oryzae. Beechwood Biological Solutions wants you to be confident you are purchasing a product that contains the best and cleanest spores and hyphae for your farm.

While our facility was under construction we contacted Dr Mary Cole of Agpath, Agricultural Pathological and Farming Services, and engaged the services of her laboratory to provide us with the initial isolation of the fungi that was collected from our farm.

Mary and her team of professional mycologists are committed and dedicated to assisting farmers to avoid the use of unnecessary chemicals and to the sustainability of agriculture.


Using Parra Trooper with a backpack spray

It is a beautiful day for fungi today so I made up a backpack of Parra Trooper. I used a stick mixer and a jug to wash the spores and hyphae from the substrate (the stuff that we grow the fungi on) and strained it into the backpack through a kitchen sieve.

This is all you need to make up small amounts of Parra Trooper spray
This is all you need to make up small amounts of Parra Trooper spray
Just put a small amount of Parra Trooper in a jug with some rain water and give it a good bit of agitation.
Just put a small amount of Parra Trooper in a jug with some rain water and give it a good bit of agitation.
Strain the liquid into the sprayer and return the solid part to the jug and wash it a couple more times to remove most of the spores.
Strain the liquid into the sprayer and return the solid part to the jug and wash it a couple more times to remove most of the spores.

Preparing Parra Trooper for spraying

Parra Trooper will arrive as a solid mass of substrate, black spores and white hyphae. To prepare a spray you will need a container for mixing, a drill powered stirrer (or similar implement) and a strainer. Then follow this procedure:

  1. Add the required amount of Parra Trooper to a sealable bucket or similar container that is half full of untreated water
    Bucket
  2. Seal the bucket so that vigorous agitation doesn’t cause splashing or spillage
    Stir
  3. Agitate well and strain liquid into the tank of your sprayer. Use a strainer that will remove particles that might block your jets or damage your pump but will allow spores and hyphae to pass through. I use a 450 micron compost tea bag (available from this site’s shop) but a fine kitchen strainer or standard tank filter may do.
    FilterPouring
  4. Return the material to the mixing bucket, add more water and repeat the agitation a couple of times so that you remove most of the spores and hyphae from the substrate.
    ReturnStir
  5. Calculate how much your sprayer will apply per hectare and top up your tank to suit the area and amount of Parra Trooper that you have mixed. As a guide, we use 200L/ha.
  6. Concentrate your spraying on rises and hills as the Nigrospora oryzae fungus naturally spreads slowly down hill in wet weather.

Notes: Always use untreated water. Wash spray tanks, lines and guns well before and after use. The Nigrospora oryzae spores are slightly heavier than water so, if your tank doesn’t have an agitator, it is best to keep the tank moving and to stir after breaks. Unused liquid will remain viable for several days.